Pages

Amazon Will Now Pay Users to Share Ad Viewing Data

Data has become a truly valuable resource because of the fact that this is the sort of thing that could potentially end up helping optimize ad campaigns and providing businesses with useful data that they can use to streamline their products. In spite of the fact that this is the case, a lot of steps taken recently have made it increasingly difficult for companies to obtain this data, thereby leading to it becoming a rather precious resource.

Amazon is taking an interesting new approach to get some valuable data. They are launching a new program that will pay users to share what ads they are seeing. Users can receive $2 a month which isn’t a lot, but it’s still the first time that a company has offered to pay users for the data instead of using third party tracking or other practices that might harm user privacy with all things having been considered and taken into account. Users that opt into the service will be taking part in the program as soon as it launches.


Amazon recently launched its Shopper Panel which allowed users in the US and the UK to share receipts from third parties and get shopping rewards in exchange. With all of that having been said and now out of the way, it is important to note that only these users will be able to opt in for the new program. This may still violate user privacy, but they would at the very least be able to consent to it and get paid a small amount in return.

This can make data collection more ethical than might have been the case otherwise. Amazon says that it will be using this data to improve interest based recommendations and show more personalized ads, which is par for the course for how this data tends to be used. Amazon has also provided assurances that this data will not be shared unless it is legally required, although it remains to be seen if they have put any loopholes into this assurance that might help them profit from the data they get by selling it later on.

Read next: Video Is One Of The Key Factors In Determining The Decisions Of Users

No comments: