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The US Justice Department Is Calling Upon Apple Higher-Ups To Testify At Its Trial Against Google

The US government is looking to depose certain high-ranking executives from Apple in its trial against Alphabet over Google and its shady history of paying companies to promote its own search engine.

America is the sort of company that parades a culture entirely built upon late-stage capitalistic excess, fully glorifies the likes of Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos, but also goes on to look alarmed when one of these individuals turns out to have monopolistic sentiments and tendencies. Exactly what anyone was expecting is beyond me, and it’s not like things really change all that much. Perhaps I’m being too harsh on the USA, since stuff really is bad everywhere across the world in one way or another. It’s just that I’ve seen an endless barrage of investigations being conducted against tech companies such as Apple and Meta, with the status quo not even being nudged into a different direction. Frances Haugen literally brought large swaths of proof stating that Facebook was promoting harmful content to its own users, presented it to the US Congress, actively quit her job in order to do so and in the process of snitching risking future employment. What happened in return? The same thing that always does: absolutely nothing. Hey man, if Luxottica can get away with monopolizing spectacles, prescription or otherwise, I guess anything is fair game.

At any rate, the US government is conducting a trial against Alphabet over yet another form on monopolistic tendencies. This time, it’s over the company’s incessant, and perhaps even illegal, promotion of the Google Search engine. Leaked documents and other forms of evidence have chronicled a rather detailed history of Google paying companies such as Apple and Samsung under the table in order to promote Search as their default engine, even across browsers such as Safari. Google Search is considered to be one of the most popular search engines of all time, but such behavior definitely goes a long way in undermining its success. Not to mention just how actively immoral it is to stifle out competition in such a manner. Then again, pretty par for the course; now let’s just sit back and see how the Justice Department handles this particular case.

Apple’s most senior executives are being called upon to attend these hearings, and while unspecified, such individuals might very well include CEO Tim Cook and Apple Fellow Phil Schiller. At any rate, what’s more interesting to me is how the USA intends on dealing with such a case. Hefty penalties don’t really mean all that much to higher-ups in multi-billion dollar companies. I mean sure, the money grubbers probably attach more intrinsic worth to their cash than to their own families, but that still doesn’t really amount to any form of punishment. Search is the dominant form of engine being used across the world, and has been so for decades. It’s very difficult to reverse the influence that has been gained by the company. I genuinely don’t see what solution the Justice Department could come up with that might actually serve as an example to other companies and conglomerates with such ideas.


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