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Overusing Social Media Could Lead to Reduced Brain Activity Among Teens

It is no secret that social media can be a bit of a burden on teenagers and adolescents, but in spite of the fact that this is the case the true impact of their usage may not be immediately apparent. That’s why researchers working at the University of North Carolina conducted a study that tried to look at how the use of social media can change the brain activity and functions of young people whose minds are still developing.

With all of that having been said and now out of the way, it is important to note that teens who used social media multiple times per day showed lower activity in the amygdala section of their brains, as well as in various other cortexes. One potential impact this could have is that it could make the teens that overuse social media more sensitive to social feedback than might have been the case otherwise.

The researchers mentioned that this should change the way teens using social media is approached because of the fact that this is the sort of thing that could potentially end up having a negative impact on their cognitive development. However, they also stated that their research is still in its very early stages, and that it will take a lot more analysis to come to any definitive conclusions.

The impacts of social media on teenage brains is still quite a recently initiated field of study with all things having been considered and taken into account. The reality that adolescent minds are being molded by social media is hard to dispute, but it is also tough to say whether this is a good or bad thing.

Physical changes in the brain are a worrying sign, but they also might indicate some kind of evolution in the human mind. Social feedback is something that people will have to deal with at some point or another, and being overly sensitive to it could have a very negative impact on an individual’s negativity to grow. The picture will become clearer once more data is acquired and subsequently analyzed.


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