Pages

CNET Has Secretly Been Using AI Tech to Write Articles Since November

The rise of AI chatbots led many to wonder if they would be replacing professional writers anytime soon. While it is fairly unlikely that Chat GPT will be writing the next great American novel, the chatbot has already managed to change the way that various articles get written online. It turns out that the folks over at CNET have already been exploring the numerous ways in which AI chatbots can help them get written content out there.

This information is coming from Gael Breton, who recently revealed that around 75 financial explainers that have been published by CNET since November of 2022 were originally written by chatbots like Chat GPT. The text is then heavily edited to give it a more professional quality, but that doesn’t change the origin of the content with all things having been considered and taken into account.


With all of that having been said and now out of the way, it is important to note that CNET admits that they used a chatbot in the content in the byline. In spite of the fact that this is the case, many users would still have assumed that they were written by real people due to the human-like quality of the articles.

The content still got flagged, and CNET has removed much of it because of the fact that this is the sort of thing that could potentially end up harming its reputation. Using chatbots to write content is not morally questionable in and of itself, but most readers would want some kind of a disclaimer that would acknowledge the source of the writing.

Sending out a press release that will reveal the use of chatbots is important to maintain standards of journalistic integrity. Outlets like CNET have a duty to be open about such things, and this indicates that there will be a shifting tide when it comes to using chatbots in the future. They are already a part of journalism, and chances are that their influence will continue to grow especially as they become increasingly advanced and can mimic humans more effectively.

Read next: Volume Of Google Searches For Excuses To Skip Work Are At An All-Time High, Proves New Study

No comments: