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Google Makes Use Of AI-Powered Technology To Decipher Bad Handwriting Of Doctors

The frustration linked to being a patient and not understanding what’s written on a prescription is annoying, to say the least.

It’s all thanks to doctors’ handwriting that makes the situation a bizarre one to be in.

But Google is answering people’s prayers linked to this matter by introducing a new technique powered by AI technology to decode what’s written. After all, the search engine giant wants you to embrace the wonders of digital technology with open arms.


This means text that was once deemed unreadable is going to be so much simpler to comprehend and we can’t think of anything that would be better than that.

The company says it’s working by the side of specialists in the world of pharmacology to set out a solution that makes prescriptions hard to read and understand. It also highlighted how the issue was a serious one and really needed a lot of attention.



Doctors setting forward treatments is definitely not a joke and when the patient can’t read what’s written, it’s just an inconvenient ordeal to be in. This particular announcement was made during Google’s 8th India event.

Google says that it already has the technology required to decipher text from images but what really was the matter here is how the difficult prescriptions have a format that’s unstructured in short. There are so many clues that only a specialist in the field could end up deciphering.

With the new machine learning model and technology thanks to Google, which has to do with AI-powered technology, we can well identify and even put certain medications in the spotlight that are seen in handwritten prescriptions. This is what Google is promoting and boasting and what could be better?

In one particular kind of prototype, Google’s executive says they showed how any person could click an image of the prescription and put it on the app of Google Lens. This processes information and highlights which medications are seen across notes.

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