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New Study Proves How Small Businesses Are Suffering Thanks To Apple’s App Tracking Transparency

Apple really shocked the digital world when it introduced stringent measures to help keep tabs on apps tracking its users without taking their consent.

The leading iPhone maker introduced its app tracking transparency policy last year and that meant only if people chose to give their consent, companies could strategically target them for their advertising gains.

But as you can expect, the masses refused to give permission, forcing some of the biggest names in the tech world to incur significant losses. We saw the likes of Meta, Snap, TikTok, and more come forward with their complaints.

However, the drama doesn’t just end there. A new report is highlighting how Apple’s new privacy changes haven’t only affected large enterprises but so many small-scale organizations as well.

Yes, the report is shunning its focus on the big players of the tech market and instead, putting small-scale organizations into the limelight and how they’ve been forced to suffer deleterious consequences thanks to Apple’s new privacy policy.

The report comes to us by the Financial Times, which makes claims after Varos carried out a new analysis of nearly 1300 firms. This proved how the expenses related to getting on board with new clients through advertising online have been much higher in 2022 when compared to that in 2021.

Small businesses are calling the price hike brutal and one that they’re having trouble coping with. On the other hand, the report also proved how businesses that don’t directly rely on advertising linked to third-party tracking systems were doing so much better than the rest.

In fact, the likes of Google Search and even Amazon failed to feel the pressure of Apple’s privacy changes because they simply don’t rely on it. Hence, they actually witnessed a boom during Q2 of this year.

Moreover, it’s interesting to note how Apple’s own personal ad business was seen blooming and stealing market share, thanks to its own changes.

Apple has fiercely fought with all critics that accuse the company of monopoly and introducing such changes for its own gains. The iPhone maker was recently caught mentioning in its defense that people’s data solely belonged to them and not to others.

For this reason, anyone that chooses to gain benefits from it must first take their consent into consideration. After all, it’s their right and one that can’t be compromised.


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