Pages

Is Instagram Guilty Of Mishandling Children's Data In The EU? Company's Fate Regarding Complaint Filed Is Weeks Away

The European Union is reportedly just a few weeks away from making a final decision regarding a complaint filed against leading social media company Instagram.

The complaint was said to be in regards to the app’s handling of data belonging to young children, as recently revealed by TechCrunch.

This decision will come after an entire protocol has been laid out to solve disputes related to the enforcement of the GDPR.

Meanwhile, this particular inquiry linked to Instagram was first opened up by the DPC in Ireland, which also happens to be Meta’s top data supervisor for functioning in the European Union, as unveiled in September of 2020.

The decision is stated to come as early as the end of this month, although no particular date was outlined. There is however a new deadline that says September first week as the tentative date to issue such a decision by the DPC.

As of now, the deputy commissioner for the DPC revealed how the decision is on its way after it had passed Article 65 of the GDPR for dispute resolution.

He mentioned in bold terms how the follow-up to the complaint arrived back last week after passing the EDPB, claiming that the decision is coming end of this month or the first week of September. But whatever the case may be, it’s definitely on its way, latest by the start of September.

For now, the regulatory boards are remaining hush regarding all details outlined in the bloc data that has been collected. Similarly, there is no news regarding what penalties the leading social media app could face, in case the regulatory bodies managed to find data that breached the clauses outlined in the GDPR.

What we do know so far is that the DPC inquiry only came about after several complaints were filed against Instagram for allowing users’ contact information to be leaked out, which too related to users coming in the minors category.

How and why such young users were allowed to move forward with business accounts is definitely worrisome for obvious reasons, adding how even their contact details were set up as being public in the app’s default settings.

For those who may not be aware, the GDPR takes such matters related to privacy very seriously as it expects all members to apply the minimal standard to make sure all children’s data is protected.

In this particular matter, the DPC has chosen to open up an investigation that comes under the volition category, instead of working through it based on a single complaint. But it does go on to mention how the inquiry began after it received data through third parties, in addition to the processing taking place by itself.

Meanwhile, today it was unveiled by the regulatory firm how the whole inquiry matter entails the issues of processing data belonging to young individuals having business accounts on the application. And also details on how the entire platform gets operated

Having an option to allow details of children to be set public by default, in case the user forgets to alter the settings, is definitely concerning as many do fail to click on private.

There is also news about the app’s CEO announced plans for him to relocate to London before the year’s end. But for now, we don’t know what the real reason behind that decision could be and if regulatory issues have something to do with it.

Whatever the case may be, he’s definitely going to be pretty near to those handling policies and those in charge of how the world of social media and tech firms operate.


Read next: Instagram Can Monitor Users’ Web Activity Each Time They Click On A Link, Claims New Report

No comments: