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Google Launches Its New Read Along Tool That’s Designed To Assist Kids With Reading

Google has recently launched a new tool for kids to assist them with reading.

The new Read Along initiative can be found on the web as an app, which was previously exclusively available to Android users only, ever since the launch in 2019 in India. But now, users will be happy to learn how the device is easily accessible to even those without Android.


Google confirmed the news and the launch via a recently published blog post. The company revealed how the new web version of the app is designed to allow young children to learn how to read better, accompanied by their parents.

Users can benefit from big screen reading by simply making a login attempt toward their browsers via both PCs as well as their laptops. Simply head to readalong.google.com to avail.

In case you’re wondering, yes, the webpage will only be working on browsers like Chrome, Firefox, and even Microsoft Edge. But that’s not all. Google has confirmed how support would be provided for a number of additional browsers soon so there’s no need to worry.

So, how exactly this app works is a question on so many people’s minds and the answer is quite simple.

Read Along enables kids to read stories that have been created by Google. They feature a wide array of subjects and different complexity levels. The stories are read to a reading assistant who goes by the name of Diya.



Not only does the assistant listen but also gives correct feedback and encourages criticism to better the child’s reading skills.

Google recently revealed how the audio processing needed to carry out the tasks occurs through the device. Moreover, these recordings are not sent out to specific servers. And if you’re interested in knowing more, well you can simply log on to the website and read more about the privacy policy enlisted.

The company hopes to launch more stories this year through the web app so more readers can benefit so do keep a lookout for that.

Read next: Google Steps Up The Pressure On Apple To Correct It's Texting by Adopting RCS Messaging

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