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Have Marketers Finally Cracked Digital Ads? This Report Suggests Yes

Digital ads have been a core aspect of the marketing industry for quite some time now, but in spite of the fact that this is the case marketers have had a lot of trouble figuring out the right formula for them. With all of that having been said and now out of the way, it is important to note that 2022 may have been a watershed year for digital ads.

New data suggests that marketers have finally cracked the code for making digital ads more successful than might have been the case otherwise. One thing to mention here is that Apple’s tracking transparency policy did not result in a decrease in personalized ads. Rather, the proportion of adults who are based in the US who saw relevant ads actually increased from 30% to 41% with all things having been considered and taken into account.

Consumers are also more likely to click on digital ads than they used to be in the past. Back in March of 2021, 57% of consumers said that they are not at all likely to click on a digital ad, 32% said that they were somewhat likely and just 11% said that they were very likely to do so. Fast forward a year and the proportions are now 44%, 42% and 14% respectively.

What this means is that a majority of users said that they might click on an ad for the very first time. This definitely indicates that marketers have found the silver bullet for digital ads, and what makes things even more impressive is that they managed to do this despite significant road blocks having been put up by Apple.

This just goes to show that third party tracking and violating user privacy is not at all mandatory nor essential. Marketers have successfully found workarounds for the lack of third party cookies, and that confirms that there is a lot of growth that can be obtained if everything is done in an above board manner. All eyes are on 2023 now since this will reveal if the positive results are permanent or just a flash in the pan.


H/T: Civic Science
Read next: 54% of Marketing Firms Plan to Increase Budgets

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