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Civil Society Groups Say Passing The Kids Online Safety Act May Do More Harm Than Good

A new letter has urged lawmakers in the country to think twice before passing the Online Safety Act for Kids.

Dozens of groups linked to civil society mentioned that such bills end up doing more harm than good. They also spoke about how such a bill would pose to be a danger to the younger generation and therefore there appeared to be no point in its existence.

Therefore, now, such groups are raising their voice against the matter and hence feel it’s time to unite and oppose such bills before it gets too late.

The bipartisan bill which is headed by the likes of Senator Richard Blumenthal would end up creating more responsibilities for those webpages that are accessed by the younger lot and also help to protect those below the age of 16.

In this way, so many digital platforms would end up warding off the risk associated with harm being done to younger users. This includes strategies that prevent the promotion of self-harm, addictions, bullying, or explicit and graphic imagery.

The bill is going to require several different websites to change default settings to an option that’s more private. It would put a limit on contacts that may associate people with others. Similarly, it would be passing out the idea of tools that parents may use to track their little ones and monitor what they’re seeing on the web. These websites would be letting the users know that their tools are in effect.

A letter speaking about the growing concerns of the civil society members also entailed such groups that would end up advocating for rights belonging to the transgender community. They mentioned how such a bill and associated tools might end up backfiring.

A lot of criticism was put forward against the bill as many feared it would over-moderate when it came down to determining which data was appropriate and which was not. They also felt that the youth would be vulnerable as a crucial path of gaining access to data would now be eliminated or restricted to a great extent.

In such a short span of time, this particular bill has really gained a lot of momentum regarding debates and how such bills relate to topics that are a little controversial like gender identity and even a person’s sexual orientation. Then there was a discussion of how such bills even prevent victims of child abuse from gaining help. There was another argument of how it’s in turn jeopardizing the access that young kids get to technology that’s private and secure like end-end encryption.


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