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Have a Job Interview Coming Up? This Google AI Can Help You Practice

Job interviews can be difficult for even the most well settled career professionals because of the fact that this is the sort of thing that could potentially end up making or breaking your career. People try to practice for interviews in lots of ways, but Google is trying to play a helping role with its brand new AI which seeks to assist interviewees in the preparation process.

This web based AI is called Interview Warmup, and with all of that having been said and now out of the way it is important to note that it can be a great tool for people that are nervous about interviews they are about to give. It then conducts an analysis of the responses you speak or type out and gives you some tips about what you can do to improve.

People that are applying for Google Certificates can often benefit from some interview help if they want to get a good job, and while this tool is still in its earliest stages and only offers basic types of questions, Google is looking to expand on its functionality as soon as it can. It can currently tell you if you are using certain words too often, and help you streamline your speech patterns to convey information more concisely which can help you get a more favorable result from any interviews you take part in.

While AI has been a mainstay in recruitment agencies for quite some time now, it has not been used to prep interviews quite so effectively. This new AI will be a major step forward, and it may give people a better chance at getting high paying jobs. The ongoing labor shortage in the US could be mitigated by services like this, so it is important to use them whenever possible. Tech companies can’t afford to operate much longer without an influx of new employees, so this AI can contribute to things improving on that front with all things having been considered and taken into account. It’s high time that someone tried to democratize corporate recruiting.


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