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Apple Is Seeking A Judicial Review Of Russian Government’s Bill, Mandating Changes Within The App Store

Apple is currently butting heads with the Russian authorities over the latter enforcing a new App Store policy, which could potentially help developers on the platform earn a bit more revenue, as reported by RT.

Apple’s uncompromising and inflexible profit cut for developers working on the platform has drawn its own fair share of online ire and derision. It’s also been subject to a few lawsuits here and there, with a both currently relevant and well-known example being one issued by Epic Games. The App Store takes a 30% cut of all earnings that developers make on the platform. Sure, one could go ahead and argue that since the Store is why Devs make any earnings in the first place, Apple is entitled to whatever it demands. However, that’s willfully ignorant of the company being a multi-billion tech conglomerate, while the developers often rely entirely on the App Store earnings to keep themselves afloat between projects. Sure, there are people who would say that such behavior on the part of Apple is still fully warranted. We have a term for such individuals as well: it starts with a form of shoe-wear, and ends with an undulating action of the tongue typically reserved for lollipops.

Ever since the Epic Games lawsuit, Apple has made a few changes to its profit policy. Specifically, its cut of the earnings is now on a flexible 15-30% scale, with developers that earn more having to pay more. This, of course, is a lot better than how things used to be but it’s still not perfect in the eyes of many. While no individual suit or government has actively attempted to deny Apple its share of the profits, other changes to the status quo have been attempted, with legal action often being pursued in accordance. The events we’ll be discussing in this article specifically pertain to such a case.

The Russian Government’s Federal Antimonopoly Service has recently passed a new bill, stating that alternate methods of payment for applications must be declared by the App Store. Take Epic Games’ very popular online video game Fortnite, for example. Under this new bill, the App Store must actively display the game’s availability within the Epic Games Store, with its own price options and whatnot, alongside it’s place on Apple’s own platform. This is a move that could let developers keep a larger share of the profits, even if they sell the game online for slightly cheaper than whatever price Apple’s settling on for its customer base.

Apple, naturally, is displeased with any such outcome and is now pursuing a judicial review of the bill. Specifically, the company was informed that it had until the 30th of September, 2021, in order to integrate all the necessary changes. Well, we’re in December now and nothing of the sort has happened. The Russian government will now be taking action against the company in the form of a fine, depending on how the review turns out. However, it seems unlikely that Apple will still consider complying to this new policy.


Read next: These are top best apps and games for the year 2021, according to Apple

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