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Microsoft Edge Reaches 11 Percent of Browser Market

Microsoft used to have a lot of control over the browser market with Internet Explorer, but in spite of the fact that this is the case this dominance crumbled fast when Google Chrome entered the fray. Internet Explorer quickly became the punchline to many jokes due to its slow performance, and many thought that this spelled the end for Microsoft’s presence in the browser industry with all things having been considered and taken into account.

The tech juggernaut has managed to bounce back with the launch of Microsoft Edge. The browser showed muted growth at first, but with all of that having been said and now out of the way it is important to note that it has picked up some steam which has helped it to finally cross the 11% mark in terms of market share, as per Statcounter data. The growth has been quite slow, but it has also been steady and that might help Edge to retain this share for longer than might have been the case otherwise.

While it is still a hug way off from Chrome’s 66% market share, it has surpassed Safari which is the browser offered by Apple. Additionally, Edge is one of the few browsers that actually saw its market share increase somewhat. Chrome’s share decreased by 0.36% which may not seem significant but Edge has shown that slow change can compound greatly over time.

It also beat out former heavyweights like Firefox and Opera, and is now securely in second place in the browser race. Offering a quality web browser is essential because of the fact that this is the sort of thing that could potentially end up keeping users within the Microsoft ecosystem. With so many criticizing Chrome for being overly bloated, many are flocking to Edge as a leaner, faster alternative which is quite similar to initial impression they had of Chrome.

Interestingly, Internet Explorer still has some users. Its market share is just 0.77%, but that is still impressive considering that it has been actively discouraged by Microsoft. Legacy Microsoft offerings are famous for having a lot of loyalists, and Internet Explorer clearly has some as well.


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