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Thrilling New Video Shows How Apple Uses A Robot To Disassemble & Recycle Its iPhones

Apple made heads turn in the year 2018 after it introduced a robot named Daisy to the world. And since then, many users have been curious about its functions.

Keeping in line with its eco-friendly efforts, the robot was known to recycle iPhones by intricately disassembling them so that parts could be separated with ease. But now, users don’t need to use their imagination any longer because one YouTuber is showing how the magic is done.

Sara Dietschy seems to have answered so many people’s prayers on the topic as viewers are guided in a fascinating manner into a realm of the unknown.

The famous YouTuber was recently invited to visit the company’s plants in Texas where all the recycling magic goes on. And it’s safe to say that it had so many at the edge of their seats.

Apple has previously delineated the robot’s great efficiency and how it can disassemble devices at the rate of 200 smartphones in just 60 minutes. And in case you’re wondering how many phones that is per year, well, estimated figures go up to 1.2 million in just one year.


After a worker adds the device to the machine, the robot removes all the parts from the phone without any help. This occurs in a series of four different modules. And we’ve briefly outlined them for you below, thanks to Sara Dietschy and its video.

Module one is all about getting rid of the display, Meanwhile, module two is all about keeping the battery on one side and the device on the other. Let’s not forget how the battery comes attached to the phone’s back which means Daisy must use a large gust of cold air to tackle the adhesive.

For the third module, Daisy unscrews the iPhone and that leads up to the final module. Here is where all of the separated parts are laid out on the conveyor belt so human workers at the plant can further align them separately into respective storage bins.

This part is very technique sensitive as it allows the company to use the separated components in the form of renewable materials from previous devices for the production of new iPhones.

A special point worth your attention is how Daisy isn’t Apple’s first-ever robot that disassembles parts for recycling. Instead, the robot arose from Liam, which the firm introduced to the world in 2016. Liam was also used for the same purpose but due to its larger size and complexity, they couldn’t move forward.

Today, Daisy serves as an excellent addition whose compact design and efficient actions do the company great justice in achieving its eco-friendly objective.



Read next: Apple Boasts Its Eco-Friendly Efforts By Claiming 50% Of Devices Were Made From Recycled Material

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