Pages

Web developers are coming face-to-face with Apple to allow the company to give a chance to other browsing engines on iOS

Apple is currently embroiled in a legal battle for its anti-competitive behavior over the last few years. Currently, some tech developers have released a new programme for the company. The project has been named "Open Web Advocacy", and the idea behind this is to make Apple enable its platform for other browsing events other than the iOS default engine. This step will allow iOS users to get connected with other engines as well.

Those who are not aware of this can understand this situation by knowing that Apple is linked with the WebKit engine only. This web engine is the source of Safari as well as other web-dependent features on the OS.

All web applications on iOS-powered devices rely on WebKit to function properly. On the other hand, the operating system of a Mac is not WebKit dependent.

As explained by the developers, when an application is dependent on WebKit for proper function, then there are many untouchable areas for the group, which doesn’t allow them to utilize the features available on the engine.

An example of this can be taken from the option which enables users to have full screen availability. This option is only restricted to third-party applications, which means that Apple users are not allowed to have the full display feature. The developers have also reported a lack of near-field communication and other related content.

Safari has been playing a major role since it made its appearance. Unfortunately, with all the other web browsing applications, Safari has shown itself to not be able to match up with other search engines. Developers have pointed out that Safari still needs to work on itself to provide its users with the features they should be able to use.

On the other hand, Apple believes that by keeping WebKit on iOS-operated devices, it can allow the tech company to have a firmer grip during their experience with the web application.

If other browsing engines get permission to work on iOS, then Apple might lose the grip it currently has.


Read next: Despite strict Apple policies several applications sell your data to many brokers

No comments: