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Apple Stores And Authorized Service Providers Will No Longer Repair Lost Or Stolen iPhones

Apple has announced its decision to put an end to the repair of all those iPhones that have been reported as missing.

A recent report by MacRumors spoke about an internally received memo about how all the App Stores and authorized service providers would no longer be entertaining repair requests for devices marked ‘missing’ via the GSMA Device Registry.

Moreover, the company would now be requiring a series of repair technicians whose purpose will be to deny any users coming through with repair requests pertaining to this category. And Apple says it plans on doing that through notifications received to these technicians about a missing status.

The status will arrive through the MobileGenius Systems or GSX that the firm commonly employs for regular servicing of its customers.

In case you weren’t already aware, the GSMA Device Registry is a device database that enlists serial numbers backed up with information regarding every device’s status.

Let’s say, for instance, a certain Apple user reports their device as missing or stolen to the respective law enforcement agencies, these officers will tag the device through the GSMA.

This will then assist all repair technicians in outlining which devices to repair and which to stay far away from, whenever they arrive at the shop.

But Apple has mentioned in the past how there is nothing new about measures being taken to ensure user security as it has always worked hard at preventing its phones from falling in the wrong hands. And this new approach seems to be no exception to the norm.

The company’s recent decision is just another build-up on its already existing policies that literally bar their technicians from bypassing the phone’s activation lock until the user themselves provides evidence that they are indeed the true owners of the device.

At the moment, Apple is yet to confirm the news being generated by MacRumors’ reports but if true, it is definitely being appreciated by the masses.

After all, what better way to protect users who may have been robbed of their devices under the most unfortunate circumstances.

Over the years, the cost of iPhones has soared to new highs and it makes absolute sense why a leading firm like Apple would want to move ahead with such a sensible approach.

Recently, Bloomberg announced how the increased rates of iPhones were actually paving the way for a market that sold second-hand Apple units. And that’s probably another reason why it’s important to be on the watch for increasing forms of malpractice.


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